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Dudley's dungeon -- Friday, 14 September, 2007

Dudley's dungeon

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Friday, 14 September, 2007
by Dion Nicolaas
You hear whistling  
sound. ........%%%%.
 ----.........%.%..%
    |............---
    ---......--.--- 
      |...@..--.....
      ---.....rrrrrr
        ---.rr--.---
          |.@-- --  
@ "Did anyone realize what a wealth of possible comics was opened here?"


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Average rating: Good
Number of ratings: 8

Comments

Grognor September 14, 2007 01:49
First comment: 4 April, 2007 1161 comments written
Uh, I don't get it. Did Snow White encounter a horde of rats somewhere?
Sappho September 14, 2007 02:54
First comment: 6 September, 2007 15 comments written
Pied piper perhaps?
Antheridium September 14, 2007 04:47
First comment: 17 May, 2007 442 comments written
Fairy tales.

Familiar Fairy Tales for Nethack.

Let's just hope the jokes actually work. Newt(kinds of) small animal, like a lizard, which spends most of
its time in the water.
        [ Oxford's Student's Dictionary of Current English ]

"Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork and blind-worm's sting,
Lizard's leg and howlet's wing,
For a charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble."
        [ Macbeth, by William Shakespeare ]

Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 by the NetHack Development Team
Copyright (c) 1994 by Boudewijn Wayers
NetHack may be freely redistributed. See license for details.
-puddingThese giant amoeboid creatures look like nothing more than
puddles of slime, but they both live and move, feeding on
metal or wood as well as the occasional dungeon explorer to
supplement their diet.

But we were not on a station platform. We were on the track ahead
as the nightmare, plastic column of fetid black iridescence oozed
tightly onward through its fifteen-foot sinus, gathering unholy
speed and driving before it a spiral, re-thickening cloud of the
pallid abyss vapor. It was a terrible, indescribable thing vaster
than any subway train -- a shapeless congeries of protoplasmic
bubbles, faintly self-luminous, and with myriads of temporary eyes
forming and unforming as pustules of greenish light all over the
tunnel-filling front that bore down upon us, crushing the frantic
penguins and slithering over the glistening floor that it and its
kind had swept so evilly free of all litter.
        [ At the Mountains of Madness, by H.P. Lovecraft ]

Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 by the NetHack Development Team
Copyright (c) 1994 by Boudewijn Wayers
NetHack may be freely redistributed. See license for details.
.
L September 14, 2007 10:18
First comment: 10 February, 2005 285 comments written
Uh, Dion...

http://www.nicolaas.net/dudley/index.php?f=20051102
Rose September 14, 2007 19:05
First comment: 3 July, 2006 79 comments written
pied piper?
Antheridium September 15, 2007 04:42
First comment: 17 May, 2007 442 comments written
Rose:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Pied_Piper_of_Hamelin

Assuming that's what you wereIn 1573, the Parliament of Dole published a decree, permitting
the inhabitants of the Franche-Comte to pursue and kill a
were-wolf or loup-garou, which infested that province,
"notwithstanding the existing laws concerning the chase."
The people were empowered to "assemble with javelins,
halberds, pikes, arquebuses and clubs, to hunt and pursue the
said were-wolf in all places where they could find it, and to
take, burn, and kill it, without incurring any fine or other
penalty." The hunt seems to have been successful, if we may
judge from the fact that the same tribunal in the following
year condemned to be burned a man named Giles Garnier, who
ran on all fours in the forest and fields and devoured little
children, "even on Friday." The poor lycanthrope, it appears,
had as slight respect for ecclesiastical feasts as the French
pig, which was not restrained by any feeling of piety from
eating infants on a fast day.
        [ The History of Vampires, by Dudley Wright ]

Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 by the NetHack Development Team
Copyright (c) 1994 by Boudewijn Wayers
NetHack may be freely redistributed. See license for details.
asking.
Rose September 17, 2007 17:34
First comment: 3 July, 2006 79 comments written
No. I was thinking, for some reason, of Micky Mouse and all the dancing brooms. And then I realized no, those are rats, and that's probably the pied piper. Hit Add and then couldn't erase the comment when I saw it had already been suggested twice by y'all :)

That's a good wikipedia link - nicely drawn illustration.
Fathead September 18, 2007 17:11
First comment: 1 April, 2006 1136 comments written
Yeah, the lichBut on its heels ere the sunset faded, there came a second
apparition, striding with incredible strides and halting when
it loomed almost upon me in the red twilight-the monstrous mummy
of some ancient king still crowned with untarnished gold but
turning to my gaze a visage that more than time or the worm had
wasted. Broken swathings flapped about the skeleton legs, and
above the crown that was set with sapphires and orange rubies, a
black something swayed and nodded horribly; but, for an instant,
I did not dream what it was. Then, in its middle, two oblique
and scarlet eyes opened and glowed like hellish coals, and two
ophidian fangs glittered in an ape-like mouth. A squat, furless,
shapeless head on a neck of disproportionate extent leaned
unspeakably down and whispered in the mummy's ear. Then, with
one stride, the titanic lich took half the distance between us,
and from out the folds of the tattered sere-cloth a gaunt arm
arose, and fleshless, taloned fingers laden with glowering gems,
reached out and fumbled for my throat . . .
        [ The Abominations of Yondo, Clark Ashton Smith, 1926 ]

Copyright (c) 1994, 1995, 1996 by the NetHack Development Team
Copyright (c) 1994 by Boudewijn Wayers
NetHack may be freely redistributed. See license for details.
is right, you've done this before.

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